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Client Information

Home Remodel and Renovation Common Questions

Below are some home remodel and renovation common questions which we answer fully.

How will the job be run?

We start with a pre-construction meeting to discuss your project.

Next we will provide you with a tentative schedule.

We will discuss specific selections such as tiles, countertops, fixtures, appliances, etc.

There will be a Project Manager on site at all times until the project is completed. Owner, George Papaheraklis, will oversee the project to ensure our high standards are upheld at all times.

Finally, we will ensure your home is professionally cleaned — at no extra charge to you.

How long will it take?

The following are approximate schedules:

 

When will our project begin and end?

Projects generally begin within 1-3 weeks of signing the contract. Completion time will vary upon size of project. (See section 2 above.)

What do you mean by “all-hands”?

There will come times during your project when the number of workers assigned may not be sufficient to get the job done quickly and efficiently. This can occur during demolition, framing, painting or the final push to get your project complete or finish punch list items. During such times we may double or triple the number of workers on your job. This is termed “all-hands.”

In such cases we will temporarily pull workers from other projects to give your project the push it needs. Conversely, there may be times where this same push is needed at another project and you may “lose” your crew for a day or two.

In either scenario — increasing or decreasing workers on your project — you will be notified ahead of time.

Will we be able to live in the house during construction?

We make every effort to keep your house livable; not only that, but we strive to disturb your life as little as possible. For instance, when working on a kitchen, we will keep your existing kitchen intact for as long as possible. When the time comes, we will even set up a temporary kitchen for you to use. However, it is sometimes faster and more economical for you to vacate your home during a project — but we’ll always discuss your options first.

What about dust control?

Some dust is inevitable, but we go out of our way to control dust. We will place plastic barriers, clean and vacuum daily and generally try to keep things tidy and neat.

What input do we have once we start?

You’re always in the driver’s seat — it’s your house, your project. Without your input and decisions there would be no project. We’ll always listen to what you have to say.

What if we want to change something?

You can suggest changes anytime you want. Some changes are easy and inexpensive; other changes can be more complicated or more expensive. It’s important to communicate changes as soon as possible, and we will work with you to make them happen.

How will payments be handled?

There will be an initial down payment and a payment schedule agreed upon when we sign the contract. The payment schedule will be based upon certain milestones in the project — such as “Framing Completion,” “Door and Window Installation” or “Final Completion.”

Will the price of the project remain the same or will it change?

This depends on if there are any changes made. If there are no changes to the Original Scope of Work the price will not change. If you request changes or additions the price will increase or decrease to reflect those changes. The only exceptions to this are unexpected concealed conditions which must be addressed — such as concealed pipes, faulty structure, rotten wood, etc. which could not have been anticipated at the start of the project.

What sets Finecraft apart?

Clients have reported that it’s our high quality of work, our ability to solve problems, our attention to details and our efficiency. But we’d like to think what really sets us apart is our care — we care for your project as if it were our own home. We care about your project every step of the way. Add that to our experience, our technical competence and insistence on the highest standards, and you have an unbeatable combination.

Why shouldn’t I go with the lowest bidder?

Statistics have shown that sooner or later the lowest bidder always gets into trouble. The statement “you get what you pay for” is very true here. Time and time again, we have been called in to fix mistakes or take over projects that the lowest bidder abandoned. Given the chance, these clients would have never chosen the lowest bidder. And in the long run, getting the lowest bidder ended up costing them more and getting them less.